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Join our Charlotte Chapter for their monthly meeting and hear updates from our Executive Director.
Date: Sunday, February 12 from 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Location: Charlotte
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Advocacy 101: The Basics
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Location: Raleigh
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The ACLU and other groups have fought hard to ensure that every eligible voter in North Carolina is able to vote. It is more important than ever that you cast a ballot and make your voice heard.

Follow these five quick tips to make sure your vote is counted this November:

  • Get registered at your current address. Check your voter registration status by visiting the North Carolina State Board of Elections website or calling 866-522-4723. The regular deadline to register is Friday, October 14. You will also have an opportunity to register during early voting beginning October 20. NOTE: In response to Hurricane Matthew, the State Board of Elections has announced that applications with October 14 or an earlier date next to the signature will be accepted if they are received on or before Wednesday, Oct. 19. Read the SBOE memo for more details.
  • Same-day registration in effect. You will also be able to register, or update your registration, at polling locations during early voting hours. Note: You cannot register to vote at the polls on Election Day, Tuesday, November 8.
  • No ID required. North Carolina's unconstitutional voter ID requirement was struck down by the courts. Most people do not need ID to vote. Visit NCvoter.org for more details.
  • Be informed. See how your state representatives voted on civil liberties by reviewing our 2016 Legislative Report Card.
  • Vote early. Early voting runs from Thursday, October 20, to Saturday, November 5. Locate your polling place and note the hours of operation by calling the state Board of Elections or visiting their website.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 8. Make sure that politicians hear your voice loud and clear this year by taking the time to register and vote.

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RALEIGH – A legislative report card released today by the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU-NC) shows that during its 2015-2016 session, the North Carolina General Assembly passed or considered a wide range of bills that diminished legal rights and civil liberties for many who call North Carolina home, especially LGBTQ people, women, immigrants, victims of police abuse, and criminal defendants.

The report card grades North Carolina House representatives on their votes on six bills introduced in the 2015-2016 session and members of the state Senate on eight. All were opposed by the ACLU-NC because of their negative impact on civil liberties.

Many of those measures were signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory, including laws that

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CHARLOTTE – The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of North Carolina joins those calling on the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) to publicly release all body and dash camera footage, as well as audio dispatch recordings, of the events surrounding the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old man with a traumatic brain injury, who, according to the Guardian’s database The Counted, was the 194th Black person killed by U.S. police this year. 

On Saturday, the department released portions of body and dash camera footage showing the moments immediately before and after police shot and killed Mr. Scott. But the department has not released all the video footage of the moments leading up to and following the encounter, leaving many questions still unanswered.

Susanna Birdsong, Policy Counsel for the ACLU of North Carolina, released the following statement:

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Keith Lamont Scott deserves justice

Posted on in Racial Justice

This week a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott, the 164th Black man killed by U.S. police this year. Mr. Scott was not a suspect for any crime. Officers were trying to execute a warrant for a different person.

Keith Lamont Scott deserves justice, and the public and Mr. Scott’s family deserve answers. That begins with transparency.

Tell Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts and Police Chief Kerr Putney to release any and all police camera footage of the events surrounding Mr. Scott’s killing.

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